Social Recruiting and Your Job Search

Just about everyone is using Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter to network – both for personal and professional reasons. Even if you’re only using these sites for personal networking, it doesn’t preclude your employer or prospective employers from checking out what you post.Are you prepared for companies and recruiters to find you on all these social media sites? If not, you should be.

Companies are increasingly using social recruiting to source candidates for employment, as well as to investigate applicants they are considering hiring. It’s important to be aware of how companies are using social media to recruit, so you can use employers’ recruiting tactics to your advantage and position yourself to be discovered by companies seeking candidates.

You should also be aware that an inappropriate post on a networking site could knock you out of contention for a new job, or even cost you the job you already have. David Manaster, CEO, ERE Media, Inc. told me about someone who recently lost his job because of something he posted on Twitter.

He’s not the only person who has gotten in trouble because of what he posted online. Every single tweet you post can be found on Google and they can come back to haunt you. You don’t want to become one of those people whose posts cost them a job, so consider David’s advice on what you shouldn’t do online.

What Not to Do When Using Social Media

  • Don’t embarrass yourself.
  • Be aware that people are reading everything you post.
  • Don’t say anything about your boss online that you wouldn’t say to him or her in person.
  • Don’t take a chance of hurting your career.

Positioning Yourself for Social Media Success

On the flip side, what can you do to use social media to boost your career and enhance your prospects of finding a job? How can job seekers capitalize on what companies are doing?

Social recruiting is a new endeavor for many companies and they are still experimenting with what works from a recruiting perspective, and what doesn’t. That means there are no hard and fast rules on how to connect and position yourself to be found, but there are tactics you can use to make the right connections with people in your industry and career field.

David explains, “It’s important to dialog with connections in your industry, even when you don’t need them. It’s too late when you need a job now.” Take some time, every day, to connect with who you know and who you don’t know – yet. However, don’t just connect with random people. Identify people who you have something in common with – college, industry, experience, professional associations, etc.

Networking Before You Need To

Build your network well in advance of when you need it. Talk to your connections on Twitter or the other networking sites. Join Groups on LinkedIn and Facebook, post and join the discussion. Be engaged and proactive in your communications. By building a network in advance, you won’t have to scramble if you unexpectedly lose your job or decide it’s time to move on.

The contacts you make online will help you transition from technology to person-to-person communications. For example, a relevant tweet can lead to an @reply (a reply in response to your post) or a DM (direct message) from a hiring manager.

David says “Use your online connections to connect with ‘real people’ online. These human connections will serve you well in the long run and help you get a foot in the door at companies of interest.”

Growing Your Network

As an example of networking building, I’m connected, mostly via LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook, with a broad base of contacts I’ve made over the years. We stay in touch, even though our careers may have transitioned since we met. All those contacts (500+ on LinkedIn and 4500+ on Twitter) are there if I need them, and I can help them, as well.

Take it one step at a time – and one contact at a time – and you’ll be able to build your own career network. It won’t happen overnight, but it doesn’t have to. Work on your network when time permits, being cognizant of the fact that your network is key to getting your next job.

Then be sure to use your network wisely and carefully, thinking twice before you post, so you’re using it to help, not hinder, your job search.

By , About.com Guide

Referrals Lead; Social Media Thrives; Job Boards Survive as Hiring Source

Job boards are far from dead. For the second consecutive year, internal transfers and promotions were the primary source of hire. A quarter of the companies that have a contingent workforce have no idea how big it is. More than half the companies use social media exclusively or as a significant part of their direct sourcing programs.

And finally, and least surprising of all, referrals continue to be the leading source of external hires.

These are among the highlights of the 10th annual Source of Hire study by CareerXroads. Released today, the study reports the results of a survey of 36 large, “well-branded” but anonymous U.S. companies who cumulatively employ 1.32 million workers and hired not quite 133,000 employees in 2010.

This is the 10th year that Gerry Crispin and Mark Mehler have conducted the survey to see where companies source their hires. As has been the case from the beginning in 2001, referrals from employees, vendors, alumni, customers, and other sources was the leading source of external hires. Last year, the surveyed companies reported 27.5 percent of their external hires came from referrals. The percentage has fluctuated only modestly over the years.
What is somewhat surprising about the referrals is that 51.7 percent of the responding companies said that up to 20 percent of their referral hires come from sources other than employees. On the other hand, 45 percent of the respondents said ALL their referral hires were recommended by employees.

Click to Expand
As strong as that number continues to be, job boards in 2010 took a big leap into second place, with almost a quarter of all external hires being sourced there.Last year, 13.2 percent of external hires came from job boards, a percentage more in line with the historic data.

Monster and CareerBuilder were the leading suppliers of hires, with 88.9 percent of the responding companies reporting they made at least one hire from Monster alone. (The similar stat for CareerBuilder was 85.7 percent.)

In past years, corporate career sites occupied second place, as a source of external hires. However, Crispin and Mehler have regularly observed that candidates come to corporate sites often by clicking on job postings on job boards or search engines.

The current report makes the same point. “Career sites are critical but they are more likely to be the end point, not the beginning or middle,” write Crispin and Mehler. There’s a diagram in the report from Jobs2Web, which, they note, “helps to illustrate that the 18.8% hires attributed to company career sites very likely came from somewhere else.”

Getting a handle on the originating referral source is still a challenge for most companies in the survey. Two-thirds of them simply don’t track their search engine marketing or optimization efforts.

The picture is much the same when it comes to their social media efforts. Most companies are able to identify candidates sourced through LinkedIn, but half can’t when it comes to other social media sources, particularly Facebook and Twitter.

Nonetheless, 57.1 percent of the respondents reported that social media played an important part in their direct sourcing program. That was the percentage reporting they researched candidates on social networks. Asked to rank the impact of social media on various parts of their recruiting program, respondents said its influence was greatest on direct sourcing, college hiring, and on hiring from job boards.

The report contains dozens of other data points, including contingent worker hiring, RPO use, and talent community management. Even with the small number of companies reporting, the report is now a classic, identifying trends and offering pints of comparison for recruiters everywhere.

As Crispin and Mehler note, “The set of conclusions from our February, 2010 9th Annual SOH Report is still valid. The 2010 data presented here merely underlines the need to continue improving how we measure the interaction of multiple sources i.e. the channels of influence that result in a hire.”

Referrals Lead; Social Media Thrives; Job Boards Survive as Hiring Source

Referrals Lead; Social Media Thrives; Job Boards Survive as Hiring Source
Job boards are far from dead. For the second consecutive year, internal transfers and promotions were the primary source of hire. A quarter of the companies that have a contingent workforce have no idea how big it is. More than half the companies use social media exclusively or as a significant part of their direct sourcing programs.

And finally, and least surprising of all, referrals continue to be the leading source of external hires.

These are among the highlights of the 10th annual Source of Hire study by CareerXroads. Released today, the study reports the results of a survey of 36 large, “well-branded” but anonymous U.S. companies who cumulatively employ 1.32 million workers and hired not quite 133,000 employees in 2010.

This is the 10th year that Gerry Crispin and Mark Mehler have conducted the survey to see where companies source their hires. As has been the case from the beginning in 2001, referrals from employees, vendors, alumni, customers, and other sources was the leading source of external hires. Last year, the surveyed companies reported 27.5 percent of their external hires came from referrals. The percentage has fluctuated only modestly over the years.

What is somewhat surprising about the referrals is that 51.7 percent of the responding companies said that up to 20 percent of their referral hires come from sources other than employees. On the other hand, 45 percent of the respondents said ALL their referral hires were recommended by employees.

Click to Expand

As strong as that number continues to be, job boards in 2010 took a big leap into second place, with almost a quarter of all external hires being sourced there.Last year, 13.2 percent of external hires came from job boards, a percentage more in line with the historic data.

Monster and CareerBuilder were the leading suppliers of hires, with 88.9 percent of the responding companies reporting they made at least one hire from Monster alone. (The similar stat for CareerBuilder was 85.7 percent.)

In past years, corporate career sites occupied second place, as a source of external hires. However, Crispin and Mehler have regularly observed that candidates come to corporate sites often by clicking on job postings on job boards or search engines.

The current report makes the same point. “Career sites are critical but they are more likely to be the end point, not the beginning or middle,” write Crispin and Mehler. There’s a diagram in the report from Jobs2Web, which, they note, “helps to illustrate that the 18.8% hires attributed to company career sites very likely came from somewhere else.”

Getting a handle on the originating referral source is still a challenge for most companies in the survey. Two-thirds of them simply don’t track their search engine marketing or optimization efforts.

The picture is much the same when it comes to their social media efforts. Most companies are able to identify candidates sourced through LinkedIn, but half can’t when it comes to other social media sources, particularly Facebook and Twitter.

Nonetheless, 57.1 percent of the respondents reported that social media played an important part in their direct sourcing program. That was the percentage reporting they researched candidates on social networks. Asked to rank the impact of social media on various parts of their recruiting program, respondents said its influence was greatest on direct sourcing, college hiring, and on hiring from job boards.

The report contains dozens of other data points, including contingent worker hiring, RPO use, and talent community management. Even with the small number of companies reporting, the report is now a classic, identifying trends and offering pints of comparison for recruiters everywhere.

As Crispin and Mehler note, “The set of conclusions from our February, 2010 9th Annual SOH Report is still valid. The 2010 data presented here merely underlines the need to continue improving how we measure the interaction of multiple sources i.e. the channels of influence that result in a hire.”

by John ZappeMar 17, 2011, 1:58 pm ET

A golden age of referral recruitment?

A Golden Age of referral recruitment?

Posted on April 14, 2010 by Matt Alder

Earlier in the year I wrote a post underlining my strong belief that we’re entering a golden age of referral recruiting as improving technology makes it possible to unlock the power of people’s social graphs. This is all very well in theory but I thought it was time I found some actual examples to prove the point.

After a bit of digging around I found an interesting economic study called “The Strength of Weak Ties” by Stanford sociologist Mark Granovetter (I can’t link to the study for reasons that will soon become apparent). Granovetter surveyed a number of working professionals in an unnamed Boston suburb, who had recently found a new job via a referral, to see how well they actually knew the person who told them about the job. The overwhelming majority indicated that they had found jobs through “weak ties” In other words they were helped by people they didn’t actually know well or talk to regularly such as old college friends, past work mates and friends of friends.

Granovetter observed: ” Usually such ties had not even been very strong when first forged….Chance meetings or mutual friends operated to reactivate such ties. It is remarkable that people receive crucial information from individuals whose very existence they have forgotten”

The most interesting thing of all is that Granovetter’s study wasn’t done in 2010, he did it 37 years ago in 1973! I can’t link to it because it isn’t even on the Internet, I found it in a book.*

So if all this was the case in 1973 imagine the huge potential for the strength of weak ties to benefit recruiting efforts in the modern world! The rise of online social networking has dramatically increased the number and geographical range of weak ties in a typical person’s social graph. It is also far easier for people to have a dialogue with their weak ties than it would have been in 1973 and possible to massively increase the reach of any job related message through social graphs via automation and the viral effect of sites like Twitter and Facebook. While this isn’t exactly an up to date case study I think it serves to further underline the massive potential of this area of social recruiting.

The key question for me is which parts of the recruitment market are going to step up and really make the most of this massive opportunity. Although there have been a few attempts to capitalize on it, I don’t believe anyone has yet managed to fully unlock the potential. It may be that it is still too early in the evolution of the social web for these type of referrals to benefit everyone but I can absolute guarantee you that they are the future of recruitment.

 

MeshHire Systems launched MeshRecruiter with complete social recruiting tools – Morgan Perterson

MeshHire, the Social Recruiting technology innovator, launched MeshRecruiter, the web-based proactive Social Recruitment Marketing platform allows recruiters and employers to market the job orders and turn all of your contacts and employees into viral recruiters. MeshHire provides recruiters the complete social recruiting tools to make recruiters’ social recruiting and referral recruiting program work smarter.  MeshRecruiter’s social recruiting tool kit includes:
-Private Branded Career Page
-Job Referral Network+
-Referral Reward Management
-Applicant Tracking System
-Job Campaign Manager
-Talent Community
-Resume Converter and Analyzer
-Real Time Reporting
read more

Strong employment brands will rule social recruiting – Omowale Casselle

Social media is redefining the way prospective candidates and employers interact. Not only do candidates now have the ability to directly communicate with employers, but they are also able to communicate with each other regarding the pros/cons of an employer. Employers have gained lots of expertise in one way communication with prospective candidates, and there is no doubt they will quickly master 2-way communication as well. However, the key to success will be how well they can influence the conversations they are not directly involved with. In these conversations, the strength of the employment brand is what will help these companies stand apart from the competition.
read more

HOW TO: Create a Social Media Recruiting Strategy – Vic Okezie

Social Media Recruiting is growing in popularity this year. Conferences like Social Recruiting Summit and Social Media in Recruitment Conference have created a steady buzz with regards to this trend. But we still have a long way to go, as most HR and Talent sourcing teams are yet to fully adopt this new tool and many are still wondering how to go about it.

In reality, no one is a Social Media Recruiting expert. The reason being that one person’s knowledge and advice for a company in a particular industry might not apply to another company – even within the same industry. This could largely depend on the culture of the company, as well as its people and processes.
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